The History Of Debtors Prisons And Why It Is Important To You (3 Of 3)

Debtors Prisons In Early American History Debtor’s Prisons existed in the United States dating from the beginning of Colonization to 1850. Numerous important early political figures were incarcerated throughout the history of debtors prisons, most likely giving the Founders a perspective on the ills of the debtor prison system. William Morris, one of the signors of the Declaration of Independence, was imprisoned from 1798-1801 in a debtors’ prison in Washington, DC. One of his more regular visitors was George Washington. James Wilson, another signor of Read More +

The History Of Debtors Prisons And Why It Is Important To You (2 Of 3)

Debtor Prisons In United States Today   In the United States, although there are no Debtors Prisons specifically, a debtor can be imprisoned in numerous circumstances under criminal penalties which are usually imposed monetarily, but for which the debtor is unable to pay. For example, persons can be found in Contempt of Court and imprisoned after nonpayment of garnishments, confiscations, fines, back taxes and child support. Such penalties are framed as Contempt of Court, the rationale given is obstruction, fraud or negligent nonpayment. Many debtors Read More +

The History Of Debtors’ Prisons And Why It Is Important To You (part 1 Of 3)

Debtors’ prisons have existed for many centuries on this planet, and in fact many forms of bonded servitude and slavery still exists today. Bonded servitude is practiced in India, and other nations, and slavery in its most brutal forms, are practiced in various parts of Africa. Debtors’ prisons are facilities where persons are imprisoned who are unwilling or unable to pay their debts. Bankruptcy Laws were eventually formulated and enacted in order to betray the harsh penalties imposed upon the populace, usually upon the most Read More +

Bankruptcy In England

Bankruptcy law in England was once quite harsh. Bankruptcy was considered a crime and people who could not pay their debts were thrown into debtors’ prison or had their ears cut off. In fact, the first legislation dealing with bankruptcy in England was the Statute of the Bankrupts in 1542. One purpose of this law was to prevent people who owed money from escaping England. Only creditors could commence a bankruptcy proceeding. This law aided in the collection of debts and did not provide relief Read More +

When Can A Student Loan Borrower Contest A Tax Offset?

Grounds To Fight The Government When They Seek To Take Your Tax Refund To Pay Student Loan Debt There are a number of Defenses that Student Loan Borrowers can use if the Department of Education or its Guaranty Agencies attempt to take your Tax Refund through a Tax Offset, in order to Collect on a Student Loan Debt Obligation. These Defenses Include: 1. Cases in which the Student Loan Borrower qualifies for a False Certification Discharge based upon Ability To Benefit, Unauthorized Signature, or Disqualifying Read More +

Seizure Of Tax Refund To Collect Federal Student Loans, Part Ii

Notice Requirements Under Tax Refund Offset Program; Say What? By Jay Weller Under 31 USC Section 3720A(b), the Department of Education, through its Secretary, can refer a Debt for Offset only after having complied with certain procedures. The holder of the loan must mail written notice to the Borrower’s last known address, as determined by the Department of Education or the Guarantor. The Courts that have heard Notice Issue Cases, have ruled that Actual Notice is not required. The Collector must only use Reasonable Means Read More +

Seizure Of Tax Refunds To Collect Student Loans

The Federal Tax Refund Offset Program Unleashed! The Federal Tax Refund Offset Program involves a complete seizure of all tax refunds that are due to debtors who are in default on their student loans. The Program also permits the seizure of monies due debtors through Special Payments such as economic stimulus monies. The Federal Statute allows these offsets, even for debts that are being administered by or collected by, a third party, or private party, acting on behalf of the Federal Government. This same Federal Read More +

Cramdown Of Mortgages On Principal Residences In Bankruptcy

Argument For Allowing Debtors To Pay Secured Value Of Homestead Through Chapter 13 Bankruptcy For Debtors who file Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, the Bankruptcy Code permits them to Cramdown or pay only the Secured Value of Fair Market Value of an Investment Property or Non Homestead Property through the Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Plan. However, Bankruptcy Code Section 1322(b)(1) states the “plan may modify the right of holders of secured claims, other than a claim secured only by a security interest in real property that is the Read More +

Current Landscape Of Loan Modifications And Foreclosures

Resets May Lead To Higher Loan Modification Defaults By Jay Weller According to The Mortgage Monitor Report by Black Knight Financial Services for February, 2014, about 95% of rate reduction modifications are still facing resets. Although Loan Modifications have been declining for more than a year, Loan Modifications through the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), a program under the jurisdiction of the Federal Housing Administration, have been increasing, largely because of modifications the FHA made to increase eligibility of Homeowners. Black Knight Financial Services claims Read More +

The Banks’ Stealth Campaign To Increase Overdraft Fees

Bank Overdraft Fees At Record High By Jay Weller The average fee for Overdrafts, which is defined as withdrawing more more a checking account than a Customer has in their account, has been increasing to thirty dollars in 2013, an increase from twenty nine dollars in 2012 and twenty six dollars in 2009, according to an investigation by Moeb Services, Inc, of 2890 Credit Unions and Banks. The Federal Reserve in 2010 prohibited Banks from automatically penalizing Customers for Overdrafts. The Dodd-Frank Law of 2011 Read More +